Mini Book Reviews: Save the Date, Ready Player One & The Silent Patient

Save the Date by Morgan Matson

It’s no secret that I adore Morgan Matson’s books. I’ll add them instantly to my TBR before I even know what they’re about. In Save the Date, Charlie’s sister Linnie is getting married at their family home – and the house is filled with all four of the Grant siblings. Well, almost. Save the Date doesn’t just focus on the protagonist, 17-year-old Charlie. The spotlight is on the entire Grant family and we get to know them all ready well. As someone who has a small family and no siblings, I enjoyed the family drama (with brother Mike in particular), all the wedding havoc (complete with an adorable rogue puppy), and the relationship between siblings, in particular JJ, who is the joker of the family and is hilarious. The Grant family are picture perfect and the basis for the comic strip created by Charlie’s mum that has made the family famous across America.

But Charlie discovers that not everything about her family can be perfect. From conflicts that the press aren’t aware of to the pressure of being the youngest in the family, Charlie’s feeling the tension build. As with most contemporary YA novels, there is a romance, but it isn’t at the centre of the story. Will is the step-in wedding planner who aims to help Charlie save her sister’s wedding, and he’s completely lovely.

If you loved To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before, you’ll probably love Morgan Matson, too.

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Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

Set in the 2040s, Halliday is the creator of the Oasis, a vast virtual society that provides everything that the real world cannot. Upon his death, he creates a video announcing that he’s hidden an Easter egg in the Oasis. Whoever finds it first wins his immense fortune – and complete control over the Oasis. And so the fun begins when 18-year-old Wade becomes the first person to discover the first key.

Ready Player One is fun, fast-paced and filled with 80s references. As it covers an entire decade, it could’ve done with celebrating a few more women – female authors, movies, directors, singers, game creators, etc. I rolled my eyes when Halliday’s favourite authors were listed… male, male, male. Halliday didn’t read anything by Ursula K. Le Guin? Or Margaret Atwood? It seems unlikely!

Ready Player One read like a game walkthrough, which I found immensely fun (or, as I’ve just discovered, is described as a Literary Role Play Game), and I loved all the characters… Wade, Aech, and Art3mis (but no, Ernest, you didn’t need to tell us it was pronounced “Artemis”), plus Shoto and Daito. I’m so glad I finally got to read this cult classic sci-fi novel. I now need to check out the film!

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The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides

I really do want to read more thrillers, but I find it incredibly difficult to choose one – I need them recommended to me! So when The Silent Patient was announced, I was intrigued. It looks set to be one of the most talked about books of 2019. In Alex Michaelides’ debut, Alicia Berenson is the silent patient. Her life is seemingly perfect. She’s a successful artist and married to famous fashion photographer, and everyone is surprised when she is found at home, having just shot her husband five times in the face. And she hasn’t said a word since. Six years later, criminal psychotherapist Theo Faber takes on the job of treating Alicia at the Grove, a secure forensic unit in North London – and Alicia’s case threatens to spiral out of control.

One of the reasons I read (albeit, rarely) thriller/crime/mystery novels is that I love not knowing what’s going to happen next, and guessing what the truth might be. I knew there was a lot of hype about The Silent Patient (something I’m unable to resist), and I kept on reading, intrigued by Alicia Berenson and her motivations, and the people in her life – who can be trusted? You’re taken on a journey through Theo’s personal and work life, not necessarily knowing where it is going or whether he’ll be able to get Alicia talking again. I would’ve loved a few more twists and turns throughout the novel rather than just one huge (although impressive) twist, but The Silent Patient certainly gave me the thirst for even more thrillers!

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What I’ve Read / All These Beautiful Strangers, My Heart Goes Bang & More Happy Than Not

All These Beautiful Strangers by Elizabeth Klehfoth

All These Beautiful Strangers was recommended by one of my good friends, Bella, who knew that I enjoyed boarding schools, secret societies, and a lot of mystery. Charlie Calloway is immensely privileged. She’s rich, has a close family, a loyal set of friends and achieved top grades at her fancy boarding school. She’s always been taught that she’s different; special, better, so when an exclusive secret society – the A’s – sends her an invitation to join the club, there’s no question that she should join. But Charlie quickly finds herself at the heart of a decades-old mystery involving a terrible family crime: what does her mother’s disappearance have to do with the A’s? And is Charlie willing to risk her membership to find out?

All These Beautiful Strangers switches between 2017 and the 1990s, with everything slowly unfolding until Charlie discovers the truth. It was such a fun, immersive read – even though I’d have loved for it to focus more on Charlie and the the A’s – and is a fabulous blend of YA and adult fiction. Charlie really develops as a character and you end up loving her even though you shouldn’t, and the twists will keep you guessing until the end.

My Heart Goes Bang by Keris Stainton

I bought My Heart Goes Bang for London Pride and it turned out to be one of my favourite books of the year. It now sits on my favourites shelf next to Freshers, and I’d absolutely love to see more books set at university. Ella, Lou, Issey, Liane and Paige are ready for their second year at the University of Liverpool and their new student house. They’re settling in when Ella comes across a magazine article with a list of men they should date before they’re 21 (e.g. someone who’s been on TV, someone who has tattoos), and challenge her house to complete it.

When you come across ‘Bastard’ and ‘Fuck. Me.’ on the first page, you know it’s going to be a great book. I adored our five protagonists and you’re bound to identify with one of them – I’m very much an Ella, fairly sensible, bookish and attracted to nice boys.

My Heart Goes Bang brought back so many memories of being at university (minus the Fuck-It List!). It’s narrated by five awesome girls – I enjoyed each of their storylines, featuring everything from bisexuality to money worries – and is sex-positive (which we need so much!), funny and relatable. I wish I had this as a fresher. There will be a sequel, right?!

More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera

Adam Silvera has been one of my favourite authors since I read They Both Die at the End & History is All You Left Me, so I was super excited when Simon & Schuster sent me a copy of his first book, newly published in the UK, More Happy Than Not. Adam Silvera does magical realism excellently. Aaron Soto lives in a world where, if you wish, your memories can be completely wiped so you no longer have to remember troubling times. Aaron hasn’t had the surgery, but he’s struggled with depression ever since his father died and, with help from his girlfriend, he’s slowly remembering what happiness feels like. But then he meets Thomas, who’s smart and funny and gets Aaron. They’re best friends until, much to his surprise, Aaron falls in love with him. And then he must make a decision.

More Happy Than Not is another brilliant contemporary story from Adam Silvera and, like his previous books, doesn’t go the way you expect it to. It deals with sexuality in an incredibly complex way. Aaron’s story is intense and sad, but layered with geeky comic book references and rediscovering the joy of being with someone who understands you. I’m ready to read What If It’s Us by Becky Albertalli and Adam Silvera!

P.S. Pretty Books is 8 years old today!

Unboxing: Rare Birds Book Club


Well, I say unboxing, but it’s more like unwrapping. Rare Birds Book Club is a book club subscription owned by Rachel. Rare Birds Book Club sends surprise books each month and the club “cherry picks the best of contemporary women’s fiction and celebrates female authors writing books we think you’ll love”. They kindly offered me a one month subscription to get a taste of the book club and chat to you guys about it. I was super excited when it landed on my desk at work!


Even though I have a lot of books (and a lot I haven’t read), Rachel managed to pick a book that I hadn’t heard of but is my sort of novel. Quite a feat! August’s book was Party Girls Die in Pearls: An Oxford Girl Mystery by Plum Sykes, set in Oxford University in 1985. I’m really looking forward to picking it up. In addition, rather than just simply sending you a book they love, you also get a secret password to access the Rare Birds Book Club and chat with fellow subscribers about the latest read. I moved house last month and it has been a little hectic so I hope there’s still time for me to join in!


Rare Birds Book Club costs £10 a month to join and, even though you might get a tiny bit more for a similar price from other book subscription boxes (e.g. a book plus additional treats), I think the book club feature is fantastic for people who aren’t on social media or who don’t get to chat about books as much as they would like. Plus Rachel promises a few extra goodies occasionally!


It’s fantastic to come across a subscription box that isn’t YA – I can definitely think of a few people I’d gift subscriptions to. It can be tricky to pick a book for someone, so I love that someone else will do it for me (if I’m not buying them National Book Tokens of course…!). If you do already own the book you receive, you only have to get in touch and Rachel will sort it out.

Thank you Rare Birds Book Club for sending my free box!

Mini Book Reviews / Are We All Lemmings & Snowflakes?, The Summer of Us & Lying About Last Summer

Are We All Lemmings & Snowflakes? by Holly Bourne

Holly is an author whose books I’ll read no matter what: her mental health + feminist chat is always on my insta read list, so when Are We All Lemmings & Snowflakes? was handed to me at work, I was super excited.

Are We All Lemmings & Snowflakes? takes place in Camp Reset, which promises a shot of “normality” for Olive, whose poor mental health is a struggle. Olive, with help from fellow campmate Louis, comes up with a plan to solve everyone’s problems, hence #KindnessIsContagious. As with Clean by Juno Dawson, I adored meeting the campmates and learning about their individual experiences. It’s important to remember that other people’s experience of mental health won’t necessarily be the same as yours, which is one of the reasons why Olive doesn’t want to know her diagnosis; it can define you, how you see yourself, and how people treat you.

I adore Holly’s writing style and Are We All Lemmings & Snowflakes?, like her other novels, tackles an important issue that people need to read about in a way that makes you understand. Self-care is a phrase that’s banded around a lot lately, but Holly shows us that it’s essential, not just for individuals, but for everyone.

“You don’t have to stop looking after yourself just to help the world. In fact, sometimes it’s better for the world if you put yourself first. That’s not being selfish, in fact looking after yourself is the greatest act of kindness you can give the world.”

The Summer of Us by Cecilia Vinesse

The Summer of Us was the first book from my summer TBR. Aubrey has two weeks before she leaves for college. She and her best friend, Rae, have planned one last trip across Europe to explore famous museums, sip champagne in fancy restaurants, and eat as many croissants as possible.

But, as usual, trouble arrives in boy-form. Jonah (Aubrey’s perfect boyfriend) is also coming along with his best friend Gabe (who Aubrey accidentally kissed, awks). And not forgetting Rae’s crush, Clara. For the past couple of years, I’ve enjoyed city break adventures with my friends, so it was fun seeing these five teenagers visit Paris, Amsterdam, Prague, Florence, and Barcelona.

It can be tricky to travel with friends, especially as I’m the anxious Aubrey-type. You’re together 24/7. It’s stressful and intense. And that’s even without the relationship drama. It was difficult to read about the tension between Audrey and Rae, and I silently pleaded with them to just talk to each other (communication is everything, people!). I enjoyed the love triangle that is Aubrey, Gabe and Jonah, plus Rae and Clara were completely adorable.

The Summer of Us is a fun novel about friendship, travel and relationships… and it was the perfect start to the summer.

Lying About Last Summer by Sue Wallman

To accompany the slightly lighter novels on my summer TBR, I thought it’d be fun to add a contemporary thriller into the mix! Skye’s older sister, Luisa, was killed in a tragic accident, and her parents think that a camp for troubled teenagers, Morely Hill, might help Skye process the grief. But once there, she begins to receive messages from someone pretending to be her dead sister.

So, Morely Hill isn’t quite as relaxing as Skye’s parents expected. She has to deal with her fellow campmates, some of whom make life extremely difficult (aka Joe), being expected to join in with activities that remind her of her sister, plus the frankly terrifying texts from someone who has access to her sister’s group message. I really felt for Skye. I haven’t experienced the death of a sibling, but it’s a lot for one teenager to hold onto, especially because she lacks someone to talk to and support her.

Lying About Last Summer deals with grief, loss, memories and guilt, and I liked that the storyline is much about Skye’s recovery as much as it is about the mystery.

My Ideal Best Bookish Friends | Chloe Seager

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I’m delighted to welcome one of my interwebz BFFs, Chloe Seager, to Pretty Books to chat about her ideal Best Bookish Friends as part of her blog tour. Chloe’s the author of Friendship Fails of Emma Nash, the sequel to Editing Emma.

I’m slightly cheating by naming not one, but five ideal BFFs from a book, but I’ve always been weirdly jealous of the Bennet sisters.

Maybe it’s because I’m (sort of) an only child, (I have a brother and a sister, although I’ve never lived with them), but their sisterly bonds fascinate me. Growing up, I’d picture telling Lizzie my secrets whilst Jane brushed my hair, dancing with Lydia and Kitty at a ball and giggling with them in a corner, or rolling my eyes at one of Mary’s strops.

Partly, what I love about their relationships is that they’re not perfect. Lizzie can be tempestuous and hot-headed, which clashes with Jane’s passive and peaceful nature. Lydia can be loud and domineering and overshadow Kitty. Mary can be judgemental and look down on all the others. They get on each other’s nerves, steal each other’s things and can be spiteful to one another.

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But despite all this, the relationships they have with each other are stronger than anything. Lizzie and Jane are each other’s stabilisers; they keep each other calm in a crowded, frantic household, and against the pressures of society. Lydia and Kitty have more fun with each other, in their sitting room, than they do anywhere else in the world. They’re each other’s confidantes, allies, entertainment and support systems. They laugh together, hurt together, think together, dream together, and above all look out for each other.

I love the concept of having a best friend who is also your sister. I know Pride and Prejudice is most commonly labeled as a romance, but it’s the sisterly friendships that make it mean so much to me.

Thanks, Chloe! Friendship Fails of Emma Nash is out now. (You can also read her previous guest post on social media and anxiety here).

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